Top sights Prague

Top sights Prague

Are you looking for the hottest sights in Amsterdam, Barcelona, Basel, Berlin, Bern, Budapest, Dublin, Frankfurt, Geneva, Hamburg, Cologne, Copenhagen, Lisbon, London, Lucerne, Madrid, Munich, Odessa, Paris, Prague, Rome, Stockholm, Vienna, and Zurich? With MyCityHighlight – Sightseeing like a local – you'll find the top sights in the most beautiful European cities from the point of view of our city managers – locals of the respective cities. You also have the opportunity to contact our city managers directly if you have any questions. Enjoy your trip with MyCityHighlight, your guide to the cities of Amsterdam, Barcelona, Basel, Berlin, Bern, Budapest, Dublin, Frankfurt, Geneva, Hamburg, Cologne, Copenhagen, Lisbon, London, Lucerne, Madrid, Munich, Odessa, Paris, Prague, Rome, Stockholm, Vienna, and Zurich.

5/5

Emmaus monastery (Emauzský klášter)

Sights

Emmaus Benedictine monastery was founded by Charles IV in 1347 and nowadays is a national cultural monument. At first glance you will notice that its sharp gilded spires aren't a characteristic sign of Gothic architecture. The reason is that during an American bombing raid on Prague the church was severely damaged and its spires were newly constructed in modern design in 1960s.

The wall paintings of the cloister depicting scenes from the both biblical testaments belong to the rarest and most precious sights of Bohemian Gothic. More than that, inside you will find permanent exhibition stands expanding on the history of Emmaus monastery. The reconstructed inner yard is a very peaceful place worth a visit in fine weather.

Read more
5/5

The Golden Lane

Sights

In 1597 the emperor Rudolf II gave this space to 24 castle marksmen who garded the fortification. But there was too little space for 24 marksmen and their families! As a result they had to build these tiny dwarfish houses.

According to a legend Golden Lane got its name after alchymists who lived in this street and searched for ways to transform metals into gold. More likely the street has its name after the goldsmiths that lived there in the 17th century.

The current appearance of the Golden Lane dates back to 1955. There is a permanent exhibition in nine out of 16 houses, documenting the life in the lane over the past five centuries, other houses serve as small souvenir shops selling ceramic stuff, puppets and jewellery.

Read more
5/5

Průhonice Castle and park

Sights

If you read the history of this place you will see that contemporary shape of the castle at Průhonice is a result of numerous reconstructions of the small medieval Gothic castle. Time has passed, owners have been changing and everyone made alterations or completely reconstructed the castle.

Count Arnošt Emanuel Silva-Tarouca was the one who founded a beautiful park in 1885. The length of its paths is approximately 23 km. Besides, the park represents a great collection of domestic and foreign plants.

Nowadays the castle is closed to public, but there is a permanent exhibition about its history in the part of the western wing, the delightful park is also worth a visit!

Read more
5/5

Jan Žižka statue

Sights

A statue of one-eyed Czech general, leader of Hussite movement Jan Žižka riding a horse is especially visible when you walk in Žižkov and Karlín districts. This is the work by a famous Czech sculptor Bohumil Kafka. By the way, he is not a relative of one more Kafka, the writer. The statue is one of the biggest equestrian ones in the world, it weighs 16,5 tons. The location of the statue is not accidental, it was Battle of Vítkov Hill where Jan Žižka defeated catholic forces led by King Sigismund in 1420.

The building behind the statue is Vítkov National Monument built in in honour of the Czechoslovak legionaries, who fought in WWI. You can check its opening hours and current exhibitions on the website. If you endeavour to get to the top of the 260 metres high hill, you won't regret as Prague will spread out before you at its finest.

Read more
5/5

Dancing House (Tančící dům)

Sights

The Dancing House or Fred and Ginger is the nickname given to this unusual 'deconstructivist' building on the Rašínovo nábřeží. The Dancing House was built on the place of a house destroyed by the U.S. bombing of Prague in 1945.


At first controversial idea to place a modern building in close proximity to Gothic, Baroque and Art-Nouveau architecture was taken skeptically, but thanks to Vaclav Havel, the first prezident of the Czech Republic, who wanted the building to become a cultural center, the project of Dancing House became real. Some say that Dancing House symbolizes changes and that Fred and Ginger invite you to dance into the unknown future.

Read more
5/5

Klementinum

Sights

Klementinum is one of the largest building complexes in Europe and covers the area of 2 hectares. It was founded by the Jesuits after their arrival in Bohemia in 1556.

Klementinum has a long and rich history and to learn more about it everyone is welcome on guided tours to the Baroque library (hall with old fresco paintings and historically rare globes), Meridian hall (where they will show you how people used to determine noon with dedal devices and sun rays) and Astronomical tower (that offers a panoramic view of Prague).

Here is a small tip for you: if you go to the part of Klementinum with studying rooms, you can buy a ticket for 10 CZK and walk around its long corridors, sit in the inner courtyard, grab some food in bistro or visit temporary exhibition that sometimes take place there.

Read more
5/5

Municipal House "Obecní dům"

Sights

Municipal House was Czech social and cultural center in 19th and 20th centuries. This magnificent, richly decorated building is a fusion of different styles of art including Art Nouveau with its characteristic natural curved lines, plants and flowers. Allegorical sculptures spread all over the building symbolize Prague, Nation, Art, Philosophy, Science, Industry, Music.

On the front wall of Municipal House you can notice a glass colorful mosaic Apotheosis of Prague by Karel Špillar. There are historical tours available in many languages. The main hall of the Municipal House (Smetana Hall) offers great concerts of classical music.

Read more
4/5

Strahov monastery (Strahovský klášter)

Sights

The story of Strahov monastery starts with Bishop of Olomouc Jindrich Zdík who had the idea of establishing a monastery of canons regular in Prague. But only with arrival of Premonstratensians in 1143 the life of the monastic community started to develop.

At first the monastery was wooden, but later as many wooden buildings was hit by the fire. The complex was reconstructed many times during its long history due to wars it witnessed and suffered from. At certain point in time it managed just to eke out an existence, but it survived and has a lot to tell. Check guided tours around Strahov monastery, have a look on its gardens and vineyard, try monastic beer.

Read more
4/5

Vyšehrad

Sights

Vyšehrad is a historic fort located on top of a hill to the south-east of Prague, it dates back to 10th century and nowadays there is a picturesque park inside. Some oldest Czech legends have it that the Slavs lived here even earlier in 7th or 8th centuries, however there is no other source to confirm it, thus legends stay legends. At the best of times for Vyšehrad the ruler had his seat behind its robust walls.

Vyšehrad is a big complex of buildings of different architectural styles and epochs. You will pass by Basilica of St. Peter and St. Paul, old Vyšehrad Cemetery with the remains of people who left a mark in Czech history or the oldest rotunda in Prague (Rotunda of St. Martin) that dates back to 11th century. Czechs like to walk around Vyšehrad because of the panoramic view of Prague, it is a common place for a picnic with a slackline, small celebration or a festival.

Read more