Top sights Lisbon

Top sights Lisbon

Are you looking for the hottest sights in Amsterdam, Barcelona, Basel, Berlin, Bern, Budapest, Dublin, Frankfurt, Geneva, Hamburg, Cologne, Copenhagen, Lisbon, London, Lucerne, Madrid, Munich, Odessa, Paris, Prague, Rome, Stockholm, Vienna, and Zurich? With MyCityHighlight – Sightseeing like a local – you'll find the top sights in the most beautiful European cities from the point of view of our city managers – locals of the respective cities. You also have the opportunity to contact our city managers directly if you have any questions. Enjoy your trip with MyCityHighlight, your guide to the cities of Amsterdam, Barcelona, Basel, Berlin, Bern, Budapest, Dublin, Frankfurt, Geneva, Hamburg, Cologne, Copenhagen, Lisbon, London, Lucerne, Madrid, Munich, Odessa, Paris, Prague, Rome, Stockholm, Vienna, and Zurich.

5/5

Bica Lift (Elevador da Bica)

Sights

This lift, as well as Lavra and Glória lifts, is a funicular that helps people going up or down the steep and long streets that are so caracteristic here in Lisbon. The Bica Lift - as well as the other two - were designed by the engineer Raoul Mesnier de Ponsard, who was also responsible for designing Santa Justa Lift. The Bica Funicular runs in the Mesericórdia district, through Rua da Bica de Duarte Belo until Bairro Alto. It connects Rua de São Paulo with Calçada do Combro and was inaugurated on 28 June 1892, which is basically seven years after the also very famous Glória lift. The Bica lift is the second most iconic funicular in Lisbon, right after the Glória Lift. In 1916, there was an accident with one of the Lift cars that crashed into the Rua de São Paulo lower station. The Bica Lift became inoperable for a few years, until 1927. The Bica Lift rises along an 11.8% incline to the Rua da Bica de Duarte Belo and runs a distance of 245 metres (804 ft), from the Rua de São Paulo, with two cars that travel this distance simultaneously in opposite directions. The street where Bica Lift stands was considered to be one of the most beautiful streets in the world!

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5/5

Palace of Queluz (Palácio de Queluz)

Sights

The Palace of Queluz (Palácio de Queluz) is a Portuguese Palace from the 18th Century, located in Queluz, Sintra. Palace of Queluz started to be built in 1746 by the Portuguese architect Mateus Vicente de Oliveira, and it is frequently referred to as the Portuguese Versailles Palace, even though Palace of Queluz is much smaller. The Palace is one of the most recent great Rococo buildings in Europe. Palace of Queluz was built as a summer retreat for Dom Pedro of Braganza, who later on became the King Consort after marrying his own niece and Queen Maria I. Afterwards, Palace of Queluz served as a discreet place of incarceration for Queen Maria I: after the death of her husband, D. Pedro, in 1786, Queen Maria started suffering from madness and these walls kept her hidden. After the destruction of the Ajuda Palace in 1794, Queluz Palace became the official residence of the Portuguese prince regent John VI and his family.
In 1908 Palace of Queluz became property of the state. It was rebuilt in 1934 after a serious fire and, today, it is open to the public as a major tourist attraction. The Palace of Queluz's gardens are magical and ideal for a sunny afternoon with the family. Palace of Queluz might be located outside of the city of Lisbon, but if you have some time it is definitely worthful! You will have to take a train from Rossio towards Sintra and exit on Monte-Abraão station. You will then need to walk for about 10 minutes.

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5/5

Estrela Basilica (Basílica da Estrela)

Sights

The Estrela Basilica is also an ancient Carmelite convent, being its official name Basilica of the Sacred Heart of Jesus. Estrela Basilica was built by the order of Queen Maria I of Portugal as a promise after giving birth to a son, Jose, Prince of Brasil. This is an example of a late Baroque architecture, with the inclusion of already Neoclassic elements. Estrela Basilica's spacious pink and black marble interior contains an Empire-style tomb of Queen Maria I. Basílica da Estrela is a beautiful monument both inside as outside, so we recommend you to go inside.

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4/5

Augusta's Street Arch (Arco da Rua Augusta)

Sights

By going up the Augusta's Street Arch you can enjoy a 360º Panoramic View to the city of Lisbon from one of its most emblematic symbols. Augusta's Street Arch represents the rebirth of a new Lisbon and it was built to commemorate the city's rebuilding after the 1755 earthquake. You can go up the Augusta's Street Arch by buying a not-so-expensive ticket, and the panoramic view will definitely pay off! Rua Augusta Arch is supported by six columns and is decorated with the statues of two different sculptors: From the base, the Portuguese sculptor Vítor Bastos, who introduced several Portuguese historical figures as Marquês de Pombal (the Kingdom’s Minister who rebuilt Lisbon after the 1755 Earthquake), Vasco da Gama (who discovered the maritime way to India, connecting the two continents - Europe and Asia), Nuno Álvares Pereira (the Portuguese general who had a decisive role in the Crisis that assured Portugal’s independence from Castille) and Viriatus (who resisted the Roman conquest of Portugal). The two leaning figures on each side represent the rivers Tagus and Douro; At the top of the Arch, the French Sculptor Célestin Anatole Calmels brought us three figures, representing Glory (in the middle) rewarding Value – the Elf figure - and Genius – the Winged figure – both of them with a Laurel Wreath. The laurel wreath was a roman tradition, where the winners who were returning from the battle fields were crowned with a laurel bouquet, to be purified from all the atrocities they were faced with. This Roman tradition gave then origin to the tradition of crowning the military victors and winners with laurel wreaths. The female allegory of Glory measures 7 meters, standing on a three-step throne and holding the two crowns. Valor is personified by an amazon wearing a helmet with dragon patterns, the symbols of the House of Bragança, and has a trophy of flags behind. The Genius figure covers a statue of Jupiter behind his left arm, and on his left side lay the attributes of writing and arts.

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4/5

Escadinhas de São Cristovão

Sights

The Escadinhas de São Cristovão connect the São Cristovão Street to Madalena Street. As a curiosity, São Cristovão is the protector saint of the travellers and peregrines, but these walls are all about Lisbon Fado. The main wall at Escadinhas de São Cristovão was created by a group of artists in February 2012. It’s full of colour and symbols of Fado, as well as the Portuguese guitars and the Fado singers - Fadistas. It also says “Cheira Bem”, meaning “It smells good”, referring to the very famous Fado song “Cheira Bem, Cheira a Lisboa” (It smells good, it smells of Lisbon) from the Fado icon Amália Rodrigues. If you have discovered this place by now then you must feel lucky and proud: this sight is not that well known amongst tourists nor even locals! Take your time to take a beautiful picture, as this is one of the best modern street art representations of the city of Lisbon.

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4/5

Quinta da Regaleira

Sights

Quinta da Regaleira is one of the most emblematic monuments in Sintra, built between 1900 and 1912. Quinta da Regaleira is the perfect place for a romantic walk or just to enjoy its beauty. You can visit the Regaleira Palace, walk around its gardens and join some of their daily cultural events. Bring your camera and be prepared to take some amazing pictures here at Quinta da Regaleira! Once here, take the chance to visit the village of Sintra, as well as the magnificent Palácio da Pena.

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4/5

Carmo Convent (Convento do Carmo)

Sights

This is another MyCityHighlight top10 highlight: the Convento do Carmo. The ruins of this Gothic church are a present and timeless reminder of the 1755 earthquake tragedy, one of the worst days in the history of Lisbon. Before that day, Carmo Convent was the largest church in Lisbon. Even though roofless and destroyed, the remaining arches and façade are still a beautiful memory of its greatness. It is the best place to understand the damages done by the 1755 earthquake, as well as it is a great place to admire the Gothic architecture presence in Lisbon.
Convent of Our Lady of Mount Carmel (Convento da Ordem do Carmo) is the official name, and it is a former Roman Catholic convent located in the Santa Maria Maior municipality. It is located next to the Santa Justa Lift, connected to its top by an iron bridge, from where you’ll have a view to the Castle and overlooking the Rossio square. The big square right in front of it is the Carmo Square.
The Carmo Convent was built between 1389 and 1423 in the Gothic style, with some influences from the Batalha Monastery, founded by King João I that was being built at the same time. Carmo Convent was one of the most imposing constructions in its architecture and decoration and, even after being ruined for more than three times, it still is. When still intact, it was considered the main Gothic Church in the city, and it was even compared to the Sé Lisbon Cathedral itself.
Overtime, many alterations have been done and added, responding to the new architectonical tastes and styles. Its main façade has a portal with several archivolts and capitals decorated with anthropomorphic motifs, and the rose window over the portal is partially destroyed. Five flying buttresses, typical of the gothic architecture, had been added to the south side of the convent, later on in 1399, after the wall collapsed during its construction. The right side of the façade has been rebuilt in neo-Gothic style in the early 20th century.
Inside, the church has a nave with three aisles and one apse where there’s the main chapel, and four side chapels. The stone roof collapsed during the earthquake and it was never rebuilt. Today, the main altar – or what used to be the main altar – is now a small archaeological museum with a collection of tombs, ceramics, statues and mosaics.
Carmo Convent was founded in 1389 by D. Nuno Álvares Pereira , who was the supreme military commander of the King, head of the Portuguese army (second in importance, only after the king). It was initially donated to the Carmelite order, but after the 1755 earthquake it lost its functionality.

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4/5

Palácio Nacional da Pena (Pena's Palace)

Sights

Palácio Nacinal da Pena, or Pena's Palace, is a beautiful palace that was considered, in 2007, one of the Portugual's seven wonders; it is also considered by many one of the most beautiful and romantic palaces in Europe. Pena Palace is located on the top of Sintra's hill and it is as beautiful inside as it is from the outside. Pena Palace is als one of the most expressive representations of the Romantism Architecture of the XIX century in Portugal. Get to know the beautiful stories and myths behind its beauty. Palácio Nacional da Pena is probably one of the most beautiful and breathtaking buildings in the region of Lisbon, so take your time to admire all of its details.

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3/5

Jerónimos Monastery (Mosteiro dos Jerónimos)

Sights

The Jeronimos Monastery is the most impressive symbol of Portugal's power and wealth during the Age of Discovery.This former Monastery (Mosteriro dos Jerónimos / Jerónimos Monastery) was considered to be a World Heritage by UNESCO in 1983, and it is one of the most prominent examples of the late Gothic Manueline style architecture. It was built to commemorate Vasco Da Gama's voyage to India and to be thankful to the Virgin Mary for its success. Therefore, Vasco da Gama's tomb was placed inside by the entrance of the Jeronimos Monastery, as well as the tomb of poet Luis de Camões, who wrote The Lusiads, glorifying the triumphs of Vasco da Gama overseas. Other historical Portuguese figures can also be found here, like the tombs of King Manuel and King Sebastião, and the poets Fernando Pessoa and Alexandre Herculano. Jerónimos Monastery beautiful building is one of the pearls of Belém and one of the most visited sights in Lisbon. Definitely, you can't miss it!

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2/5

S. Jorge Castle (Castelo de São Jorge)

Sights

Castelo de São Jorge is situated on top of the highest hill of Lisbon and from there you can have the best view in town. S. Jorge Castle was a Moorish fortification, until the day Afonso Henriques - Portugal's first King - opened the gates to the Christians. You can have a great look towards the Castle by going to some of Lisbon's viewing points, as the top of Rossio Central Station, the Topo Bar and the Rooftop of Hotel Mundial.

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